5 Ways to Boost Your Self-Worth

I just received a valuable lesson on self-worth from a surprising source: My accountant. It wasn’t intentional—she was simply talking about savings, interest and expenses as she went through my neatly organized documents. I just happened to find deeper meaning in her words.

Her advice: Don’t spend more than you have.
My interpretation:
Good boundaries are imperative—never give more help or attention than you are willing to receive.

Her advice: Budget. Know where your money is going.
My interpretation:
Be mindful of how you spend your time. Always have the basics—like sleep, exercise and rest—”budgeted” for, and prioritize whatever else is important to you, like travel, self-improvement, socializing or a day at the spa.

Her advice: Allocate and diversify your assets.
My interpretation:
Don’t base all your self-worth on one person, skill or quality. If this “stock” performs poorly, you’re broke. A better option: Diversify your relationships, skills and qualities.

Her advice: Don’t be afraid to make changes. If a stock no longer performs well or you decide to become more or less aggressive, you can sell and invest in a different stock.
My interpretation: Embrace change. Be open to learning from your life and allow yourself to let go of “old ways” when they no longer serve you.

Her advice: Don’t worry about dips and losses. They’re totally normal.
My interpretation:
You do not lose value every time you fail, stumble or make a mistake. It’s not about perfection—it’s about overall performance over time.

As you survive tax season and look toward next year, consider investing in your self-worth—not just your net worth. What investment would you like to make in your self-worth?

  • LastTimeLoser

    I loved this one:  “Embrace change. Be open to learning from your life and allow yourself to let go of “old ways” when they no longer serve you.”

    I was self-talking not too long ago.  I had had a bad day prior and was spending my commute indulging in beating myself up for all the mistakes I have made in my life and all the bad habits I had gotten into.  When it eventually dawned on me that there was not a THING I could do about those bad choices of my past, I started a new mantra:  “let it go let it go let it go let it go”.  It’s stupid and the other drivers look at me oddly but it at least gets me out of the constant mental-scab-picking I would otherwise be doing.

  • LastTimeLoser

    I loved this one:  “Embrace change. Be open to learning from your life and allow yourself to let go of “old ways” when they no longer serve you.”

    I was self-talking not too long ago.  I had had a bad day prior and was spending my commute indulging in beating myself up for all the mistakes I have made in my life and all the bad habits I had gotten into.  When it eventually dawned on me that there was not a THING I could do about those bad choices of my past, I started a new mantra:  “let it go let it go let it go let it go”.  It’s stupid and the other drivers look at me oddly but it at least gets me out of the constant mental-scab-picking I would otherwise be doing.

  • James Rhodes

    I also love “Embrace Change”. I “grew up” with my parents admonitions to get a good job, one with benefits, in other words there was no taking into consideration as to what my passion may have been. Then at age 44 I jumped. Put myself through the California Culinary Academy, moved way out of my “comfort zone” and have been doing it ever since. Now I don’t think twice about saying yes to opportunity. I have had a fabulous life with much experience since then. Even have gotten to teach a class and cook at The James Beard House in NYC. Who would have ever thought!

    • Angela Taylor

      James, I love this! Thank you for being brave in your life and being open to sharing your experience. What are we doing if we aren’t doing what we feel meant to do?!?

  • James Rhodes

    I also love “Embrace Change”. I “grew up” with my parents admonitions to get a good job, one with benefits, in other words there was no taking into consideration as to what my passion may have been. Then at age 44 I jumped. Put myself through the California Culinary Academy, moved way out of my “comfort zone” and have been doing it ever since. Now I don’t think twice about saying yes to opportunity. I have had a fabulous life with much experience since then. Even have gotten to teach a class and cook at The James Beard House in NYC. Who would have ever thought!

    • Angela Taylor

      James, I love this! Thank you for being brave in your life and being open to sharing your experience. What are we doing if we aren’t doing what we feel meant to do?!?